Embroidery

Free Mother’s Day Embroidery Pattern

Today I have a free Mother’s Day embroidery pattern for you! It says “I’m so thankful you’re my mom,” which really means you can give it to your mom any time of year. It would also make a sweet birthday gift or thank you gift (because you can always thank your mom for being awesome!). But Mother’s Day is next month, so it seemed good to share this embroidery pattern now.

Free Mother's Day Embroidery Pattern | I'm So Thankful You're My Mom | Radiant Home Studio

(This post contains affiliate links, which means I make a small commission for recommending products at no cost to you. Thanks!)

I enjoy making patterns that can be given as gifts to encourage other people. And who better to encourage than your mom? Plus, she’ll appreciate the time and love that goes into a handmade gift.

Free Mother's Day Embroidery Pattern | I'm So Thankful You're My Mom | Radiant Home Studio

This is a full-length pattern with step-by-step photos and instructions for both a 6″ and 8″ hoop design. I’ve also included photos of each type of stitch and tips for finishing the hoop. I also have suggested floss colors but you are welcome to choose your own. To download the pattern, just enter your email below to get access to my free resource library. You’ll receive a welcome email with a link and password. (There are also some printable planning pages, a sewing glossary, and a couple of other patterns just for my subscribers!)

 

 

Free Mother's Day Embroidery Pattern | I'm So Thankful You're My Mom | Radiant Home Studio

Free Mother's Day Embroidery Pattern | I'm So Thankful You're My Mom | Radiant Home Studio

This pattern uses 3 stitches: a backstitch, a satin stitch, and a colonial knot (similar to a French knot, but easier in my opinion!). If you aren’t familiar with these stitches, Mollie Makes has a good post showing the steps for each stitch and I have photos and instructions included in the pattern. These are my suggestions, but you can always simplify it by stitching all of the lines with a backstitch.

Free Mother's Day Embroidery Pattern | I'm So Thankful You're My Mom | Radiant Home Studio

I usually just trace my pattern onto white fabric by holding it up to the window, but if you have darker fabric or fabric that needs stabilizing you might want to try some water-soluble fabric stabilizer. The pattern directions include a few transfer options in more detail.

You’ll also need a good embroidery needle, about 5-6 colors of embroidery floss, a 10″ square of fabric, and an embroidery hoop (there are designs for both a 6″ and 8″ hoop).

I love to have a hand stitching project available for those moments when I’m waiting around for something. It’s so much more satisfying than mindlessly scrolling through Instagram. I finished my stitching in just two days by working on it in smaller chunks of time throughout the day. If only I could make that work for sewing bags and clothes on the sewing machine!

Free Mother's Day Embroidery Pattern | I'm So Thankful You're My Mom | Radiant Home Studio

 

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Pattern Review, Sewing

Marigold Dress in Chambray

Back in January, I discovered the Marigold Dress pattern by Blank Slate patterns. I was familiar with Blank Slate before, but it’s not one of my go-to pattern companies. I had seen the Marigold before, but it was Abbey’s short-sleeved chambray version that grabbed my attention.

Marigold Dress in Chambray | Blank Slate Patterns | Radiant Home Studio

(This post contains affiliate links, which means I make a small commission at no cost to you. Thanks!)

With a nursing baby, I’ve struggled to find dresses that work for me. I actually spent hours looking for any type of dress that was nursing friendly a few weeks ago. We had a last minute Christmas party and I didn’t have anything in my closet that seemed appropriate and no time to sew. In the end, I settled for a very stretchy knit A-line dress that definitely wasn’t appropriate for nursing in public. I had to find a place to hide just to feed the baby.

When I saw the Marigold and realized that it would work for nursing, I remembered how thankful I am for the ability to sew what I need. You would think a shirt dress would be relatively easy to find, but it just seemed to be “out of style” this season and impossible to find.

Marigold Dress in Chambray | Blank Slate Patterns | Radiant Home Studio

I started sewing in January, and what should have been a 3-hour project took 6 weeks of sewing in 10-15 minute spurts. It was definitely not the most efficient method of sewing since I had to keep finding my place every time I got started again. But with a 6-month old baby, you sew when you can—even if that means it’s only 15 minutes here and there.

I chose some Kaufman Chambray for my Marigold Dress. It’s lightweight and has a nice drape. The fabric is slightly sheer, but I always layer tank tops and bike shorts or a slip under my dresses so it seemed fine. I wouldn’t recommend it for a dress or skirt without an extra layer though.

The Marigold pattern has lots of options. You can make it with longer sleeves, a belt, skirt only, or as a peplum top. I chose to make a short-sleeved version of the dress, with the longest skirt length. I think it will be a great year-round style. I can wear it in the summer as it is and also layer it with a sweater and leggings on a cold day.

Marigold Dress in Chambray | Blank Slate Patterns | Radiant Home Studio

The pattern instructions were well-organized, especially considering all of the options available. I was able to follow the instructions for my style without confusion. Though I prefer illustrations, I found the photos clear and helpful for construction. I should have looked through the pattern for information on seam finishes before cutting. The collar, placket, and shoulder seams are all clean and hidden, but the side seams need to be finished. My serger seized up last month so I ended up sewing french seams on the sides of the bodice and skirt. I would have cut slightly larger seam allowances if I had planned ahead.

I made a size medium with no alterations. My bust and measurements were right in line with the size chart and my waist is a couple of inches larger. Since the elastic in the waist can be adjusted to the right size, I didn’t worry about that. The finished fit is great, and I don’t think I would make any changes. It’s a flexible style and will continue to fit as I lose baby weight or if I gain a few pounds.

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Pattern Review, Sewing

Waxed Canvas & Leather Zipper Bag

Last year I made a waxed canvas zipper bag for my 12-year-old son’s birthday. My husband mentioned (more than a couple of times) how nice it was. I got the hint, and he got one for Christmas.

Waxed Canvas & Leather Zipper Bag | Gentlemen's Travel Case by Betz White | Radiant Home Studio

(This post contains affiliate links, which means I make a small commission at no cost to you. Thanks!)

For my son’s zipper bag, I used canvas and waxed it myself using Otter Wax. For this bag, I ordered some pre-waxed canvas and a leather strap from The Confident Stitch. (This is a new-to-me fabric store. They have some great stuff and the owner is super helpful, so definitely check it out!) They have several colors and weights of waxed canvas. I chose the 6.25oz in olive green and it was exactly what I needed for this project!

I also ordered a 3/4″ leather strap. It was very nice quality and I will definitely purchase this item again for other bags in the future.

Waxed Canvas & Leather Zipper Bag | Gentlemen's Travel Case by Betz White | Radiant Home Studio

The pattern is the Gentlemen’s Travel Case from Betz White’s book Present Perfect, which is the same pattern I used for the pouch I made last year. There are lots of similar zipper pouch patterns that would work, but I really like the interior pleated pocket and the exterior pockets on this pattern. It’s a nice size, deep enough for some bigger items, but not too big. I sewed it as instructed, but substituted a metal snap in place of the hook-and-loop tape on the side pocket. I also left off the decorative trim next to the zipper.

Waxed Canvas & Leather Zipper Bag | Gentlemen's Travel Case by Betz White | Radiant Home Studio

I actually made 2 of these at the same time, one for my husband and one for his brother. I think it was faster to sew them that way. I already had the fabric, interfacing, and patterns out, so it went almost as quickly as making one. I had a yard of both the waxed canvas and the lining fabric, which was plenty for two zipper bags.

Waxed Canvas & Leather Zipper Bag | Gentlemen's Travel Case by Betz White | Radiant Home Studio

I used the waxed canvas on the entire exterior and on the lining pieces that are next to the zipper (for stability). I can’t remember if the pattern recommends interfacing the exterior pieces, but there’s no need to interface waxed canvas. It’s pretty stable and perfect for casual bags. Though I love Otter Wax for small projects, I really appreciated using the ready-made waxed canvas. It saved a lot of time and I didn’t have to worry about waiting for it to dry and cure. I can’t say I’ll never wax my own fabric again, but it’s good to have options! For bigger projects and things that are time sensitive, I will definitely be ordering again.

Waxed Canvas & Leather Zipper Bag | Gentlemen's Travel Case by Betz White | Radiant Home Studio

The Confident Stitch also has some heavier waxed canvas that would be great for bigger tote bags. I’ll be looking for a project to experiment with the heavier weight waxed canvas when I get a chance. You can click the image below to see what other fabrics and notions they carry!

Confident Stitch Notions

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Tutorials

How to Sew a Pennant Banner for Parties

Learn how to sew a pennant banner for parties! They are easy to sew, reusable, and prettier than paper buntings from party stores. Pennant flags are fun home decor for any occasion, including birthdays, baby showers, and weddings!

There are lots of sewing tutorials for sewing pennant banners (or buntings, as some people call them) out there, but I haven’t seen any tutorials with an illustrated cutting guide to help you make the most of your fabric. Since I just made a new one to use for a baby shower, I thought I would take some photos and explain my simple process. I have a simple cutting method that will help you to use most of your fabric with less waste!

How to Sew a Pennant Banner For Parties | DIY Bunting or Mordern Pennant Flags | Radiant Home Studio

I really like to have a couple of all-purpose pennant banners around for parties. I don’t like tacky paper decorations from the dollar store and I hate to buy them only to throw them in the trash after using them. Fabric banners are reusable and don’t take much storage space. If you make a 2 or 3 with different color schemes, you should be able to use them for many occasions.

I’ve had one with girl colors for a few years that we hang up on the girls’ birthdays or for other summer parties. I’ve been planning to make one in another color scheme to use for the boys’ birthdays and other events, like the baby shower we just hosted.

We planned a “winter woodland” baby shower, so I tried to choose fabrics that would work with the baby shower theme that would also be neutral and not too “babyish”. I ended up with some great geometric fabric designs in gray, cream, black, green, and teal. When choosing fabrics, sticking to a small color palette will help the finished banner to have a cohesive style. The fabrics don’t have to match perfectly (for example, some of the grays have different undertones), but keeping to similar colors works best.

Many of the tutorials I saw recommended stitching the flags right sides together, then turning them inside out, and then pressing the seams. You can do this if you really want the seams hidden, but I think it’s unnecessary and takes too much time for a project like this.

How to Sew a Pennant Banner For Parties | DIY Bunting or Mordern Pennant Flags | Radiant Home Studio

(This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission at no cost to you. Thanks!)

How to Sew a Pennant Banner:

Materials:

3 to 5 coordinating cotton fabrics – 1 yd. of each (or just use up your scraps!)
coordinating thread
bias tape maker (or pre-made binding)
rotary cutter and mat
printable template

How to Sew a Pennant Banner For Parties | DIY Bunting or Mordern Pennant Flags | Radiant Home Studio

Cutting Instructions:

There are two ways to cut the pennant flags. The template works best if you are using up fabric scraps, but if you are cutting from yardage it’s much faster to use the rotary cutting method. I’ve included an illustrated cutting diagram below.

First, even out your edges. I bought my fabric from a big box store and the cuts were 2-3 inches off grain.

Fold the fabric folded in half lengthwise, selvages together, cut three 9″ strips across the fabric.

Line up the folded edge with the edge of the cutting mat. Use the ruler to cut a diagonal line from the bottom folded corner to the top of the strip, 3″ in from the folded edge.

Use the ruler to make another diagonal line from the 3″ cut at the top edge to a spot 6″ in from the bottom edge.

How to Sew a Pennant Banner For Parties | DIY Bunting or Mordern Pennant Flags | Radiant Home Studio

Keep cutting diagonal lines in opposite directions every 6″ until you run out of fabric.

If you are using directional fabric, like the mountains I used, you’ll end up with some flags with the print upside-down. I just paired the right-side-up flags with upside-down flags and made sure I paid attention to which was the back and the front of each flag.

How to Sew Pennant Flags for Parties | Cutting Pennant Flags from 1 yd. of Fabric | Radiant Home Studio

Sewing Instructions:

I’ve used 2 different methods for finishing the edges of the flags. If you have a serger, you can serge the 2 long edges with a rolled hem or narrow 3-thread stitch. (I started out doing this and it was super fast until my serger seized up…)

If you don’t have a serger, just use a tight zig-zag stitch. Make sure the needle goes off the edge of the fabric just slightly on the right side of the zig-zag stitch. You might end up with a little bit of a ruffled edge. Just press each flag and trim the threads when you finish.

To make the binding, cut 2″ strips of fabric. (Five strips make the banner about 18′ long and will hold about 24 flags. Mine has 8 strips with 35 flags, and I still have some fabric left.) Since this binding doesn’t need to be sewn around curves, it does not have to be cut on the bias. Just cut straight across like you did for the 9″ flag strips. Trim the ends of the strips at a 45° angle. Sew them together in one long strip by matching the ends as shown.

How to Sew a Pennant Banner For Parties | DIY Bunting or Mordern Pennant Flags | Radiant Home Studio

Trim the little corners off the strips and use the bias tape maker and your iron to create the binding.

How to Sew a Pennant Banner For Parties | DIY Bunting or Mordern Pennant Flags | Radiant Home Studio

Organize your flags into a pile in the order you want them to hang on the banner.

Place the binding on your sewing machine with the folded edge to the right. Stitch 8-10″ on the open edge and then sandwich the first flag into the binding all the way into the folded edge. Continue stitching over the first flag. Sandwich the next flag in the binding leaving a 3-4″ gap between the flags. Continue stitching until you have added all your flags or until you run out of binding.

How to Sew a Pennant Banner For Parties | DIY Bunting or Mordern Pennant Flags | Radiant Home Studio

You can hang the finished pennant banner with a few thumbtacks.

How to Sew a Pennant Banner For Parties | DIY Bunting or Mordern Pennant Flags | Radiant Home Studio

How to Sew a Pennant Banner For Parties | DIY Bunting or Mordern Pennant Flags | Radiant Home Studio

How to Sew a Pennant Banner For Parties | DIY Bunting or Mordern Pennant Flags | Radiant Home Studio

How to Sew a Pennant Banner For Parties | DIY Bunting or Mordern Pennant Flags | Radiant Home Studio

 

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